Cover Story

Our monthly cover story in Real Estate NJ is a must-read, as we bring you an insider’s look at the decisions, personalities and economic conditions that are shaping the market.

Commercial landlords hope for continued growth

Experts believe the reforms will spur additional growth during an expansion that will soon be the second-longest in U.S. history, thanks in part to a sweeping cut to the corporate tax rate from 35 to 21 percent. That bodes well for New Jersey’s office and industrial landlords.

A rebound for investment activity

When it came to commercial real estate, many investors had likely felt that property values had peaked in 2016, that the bull run was ending and the economy was due for a pullback. Those are among the reasons that Jeff Otteau feels overall investment sales in New Jersey fell last year to $6.5 billion, from $8.3 billion in 2016, while activity also slowed in New York City. Yet that trend could be in store for a reversal as a result of the newly amended tax code, which has preserved and added to the benefits given to real estate investors.

With a deep bench, SJP is seizing new opportunities as a third-party developer and partner

With an in-house, full-service construction team — an asset that is increasingly rare among developers — SJP Properties is being both aggressive and creative in keeping its pipeline full in New Jersey. That means everything from third-party development work to joint ventures and acquisitions that could pave the way for new projects.

How SJP is filling its talent pipeline

Commercial real estate firms in recent years have grappled with finding young talent to help fortify their ranks for years to come. But Steve Pozycki believes the long-term stability of SJP Properties has helped it attract the next generation of executives.

In Bridgewater, SJP is meeting the needs of today — and tomorrow

In addition to searching for new development opportunities, SJP Properties is focused on ensuring that its existing buildings stay at the top of the market.

The Amazon effect: The e-commerce giant has infiltrated every major asset class in New Jersey

Amazon has long been known for having a profound impact on the bricks-and-mortar retail business. But as it turns out, that’s only one piece of the story of how the e-commerce powerhouse is transforming commercial real estate. New Jersey is poised to feel that impact as much as any other state in the country.

All hands on deck: How Newark’s bid for Amazon HQ2 rallied landlords, city officials

While there are still months to go before Amazon reveals it selection for its HQ2 project, making the pitch has rallied developers and public-sector leaders in Newark in a way that the city hasn’t seen in recent memory. That show of unity was only amplified on Oct. 16, when Gov. Chris Christie announced that the state would officially support the city’s bid, even as several other cities in New Jersey jockeyed for the project.

Game-changer: Amazon has been a driving force in surging N.J. distribution market

There’s no ignoring Amazon’s impact on the state’s industrial sector since early 2013, when the company committed to building its first New Jersey fulfillment center in Robbinsville. Not only has Amazon absorbed at least roughly 9 million square feet of warehouse and distribution space since that time. It quickly emboldened other pure e-commerce players that were hesitant to establish a footprint in New Jersey, amid concerns over having to collect sales tax from customers if they had a physical location here.

Smart homes: Amazon making inroads in package delivery, sound systems

Amazon in mid-October detailed a partnership with some of the country’s largest apartment owners and management firms to install its smart phone-connected package lockers at their properties, in the latest sign of the impact that e-commerce has had on the multifamily sector. Developers have sought to include more sophisticated package rooms and concierge services into their new luxury projects in recent years, in an effort to handle the constant stream of boxes coming into their buildings.

A new front in grocery wars: Whole Foods acquisition will add fuel to ultracompetitive supermarket sector

The news of Amazon’s $13.7 billion acquisition of Whole Foods Market this summer came with a bit of irony: Many bricks-and-mortar supermarkets in New Jersey and elsewhere had offered online delivery for years, but Whole Foods wasn’t among them. But at the very least, the deal signaled to those other operators that Whole Foods is not to be taken lightly, especially with Amazon’s stated goal of lowering the chain’s notoriously high prices.